Doing the last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago

It is not surprising that many people want to do only the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago. Most pilgrims look to return home with the coveted Compostela (also wrongly called Compostelana).

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The last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago is the minimum distance required by the Pilgrim’s Office for people arriving in Santiago de Compostela on foot, to grant them the Compostela. In the case of the pilgrims who do the Camino de Santiago by bicycle, the number of kilometres is 200.

In addition to the above, the last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago is a perfect distance to complete walking in 4 or 5 days. This allows you to escape to the Camino de Santiago on a short holiday or on a long weekend.

We want to dedicate this article to talk to you about the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago. As we have mentioned on several occasions, there are several routes on the Camino de Santiago, therefore, to talk about the last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago is to talk about each of the last sections of the different routes of the Camino de Santiago.

Camino Frances to Santiago: last 100 km

When reference is made to the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago, the last section of the Camino Frances is usually being referred to. The one that joins Sarria with Santiago de Compostela.

This is because these last kilometres of the Camino Frances are the most popular. You can read more about these last kms along the French route in the article on our blog about the Camino de Santiago that we dedicate to the section Sarria-Compostela.

However, this section has a total of 114.2 kilometres of travel. If you want to adjust the route to the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago, you can start your pilgrimage from Ferreiros. From this town to Santiago de Compostela there are a total of 101 kilometres.

Camino Portugues to Santiago: last 100 kms

To talk about the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago Portugues it is necessary to talk about both the Camino Central Portugues and the Coastal Route. In this article you will find information about the two Portuguese routes.

The last 100 km of the Camino Central Portugues 

As is the case on the Camino Frances, when alluding to the last 100 km of the Camino Portugues, people often think of the stretch between Tui and Santiago de Compostela. In this post you can read more about this last section of the Camino Portugues Central.

Although, in reality, this section is 117.4 km long. To complete the last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago by the Central Route in Portugal, you can start from the town of O Porriño. From there to Santiago de Compostela it is a distance of 101.2 km.

The last 100 km on the Camino Portugues Coastal Route

If after studying the characteristics of both routes, you decide to follow the Coastal Route, you can start your pilgrimage from the city of Vigo. From there the route to Compostela is 102 kilometres.

In fact, there are not many differences between doing the last 100 km of the Camino Portugues following the Central Route or the Coastal Route. The only difference is the first stage.

If you choose the Camino Central Portugues on the first day, you will complete the section that joins O Porriño with Redondela. While doing the Camino Portugues Coastal Route, you will follow the route that connects Vigo with Redondela.

From the second day, from Redondela, both sections run together to Santiago de Compostela. Therefore, when choosing which of the two Portuguese routes to follow to complete the last 100 kms on the Camino de Santiago Portugues, you only have to decide on this first stage.

Camino Ingles: the last 100 kilometres

The Camino Ingles is a very short route. The entire journey from Ferrol to Santiago de Compostela has, in total, 122.3 kilometres. That makes it one of the preferred routes for those who have little time to complete the Camino de Santiago.

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Given its low distance, most people who decide to follow this route, do it completely, from Ferrol. If you want, you can learn more about this route in the article we dedicate to the stages on the Camino Ingles.

However, if you want to adjust the route of the Camino de Santiago Ingles to the last 100 kms, you can start from the town of Fene. From there, Compostela is 102 kilometres away.

The last 100 km on La Vía de la Plata: the Camino Sanabres

As we explained in the article we dedicated to the  Via de la Plata, this huge section, forks when arriving in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. From Granja de Moreruela you can follow the route that goes through Astorga, and joins the Camino Frances, or the Camino Sanabres.

The last 100 kilometres on the Astorga variant

If you want to complete the last 100 kms of the Via de la Plata, it makes no sense for you to take the Astorga variant, since in that case, you would be doing the last 100 kms of the Camino Frances. However, if you want more details about the stages on the variant of the Via de la Plata through Astorga, click on the link.

The last 100 kilometres on the Camino Sanabres

To talk about completing the last 100 km of the Via de la Plata is to talk about the Camino Sanabres. This route starts from Granja de Moreruela. As we tell you in the post we dedicate to the Camino Sanabres, from there, the route is 366 kilometres in distance, divided into 15 stages.

However, if you start your pilgrimage from the city of Ourense, you will face only the last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago Sanabres. Or, to be more precise, the last 107 km.

The Camino del Norte: the last 100 kms

Unlike the previous paths, the Camino del Norte is much more complicated. To complete the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago del Norte you can start from the town of Baamonde.

From this town to Santiago de Compostela there are, in total, 101 kilometres to travel. The first two stages on this route are carried out following the proper route of the Camino del Norte.

From the third stage, in Arzúa, the Camino del Norte joins with the Camino Frances. From there they continue together to Santiago de Compostela.

Therefore, doing the last 100 kms of the Camino de Santiago del Norte involves doing 62 kilometres along the Northern Route and 39 km along the Camino Frances. A little bit of everything!

Camino Primitivo: the last 100 kms

The Camino Primitivo is the most difficult pilgrim route. To complete the last 100 kms on the Camino Primitivo you will have to start from one of the villages before Lugo.

The city of Lugo would be the most natural start, but from there to Santiago de Compostela, the route is 99.2 kilometres long. Therefore, it is likely that the Pilgrim’s Office will make it difficult to grant you the Compostela.

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To be sure, it’s best to start a little earlier. The village of As Casas da Viña, in the Parish of Carballido, is 6 kilometres away. From there the route has a total of 105 kilometres.

The last 100 kms on the Camino de Invierno

A fairly unknown route is the Camino de Invierno. In fact, it is a variant of the Camino Frances used by pilgrims in the Middle Ages, during cold times, when the chances of finding snow in the mountain passes of Foncebadón or O Cebreiro were very high.

The Camino de Invierno begins in Ponferrada. From there, as we tell you in the article we dedicate to the Winter Trail, the route is 180 kilometres long.

However, if you want to do only the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago, following the Camino de Invierno, you can start the tour from the village of Monforte de Lemos. In total, 103 kilometres separate this town from Santiago de Compostela.

By completing this last section of the Camino de Invierno, you will complete 3 stages of this route and 2 following the Camino Sanabres. A tour of alternative and little-known routes!

Camino de Finisterre: last 100 kilometres

The most common thing is to do the Camino de Finisterre after arriving in Santiago de Compostela, following one of the other Jacobean routes. However, if you take this tour in the opposite direction, that is from Finisterre to Santiago de Compostela, you can request the Compostela when you arrive at the Cathedral of Santiago.

To do the last 100 kilometres of the Camino de Finisterre you will have to start from Lires. A town located between Finisterre and Muxía. From there the route is 100 exactly kilometres.

Other routes in pilgrim tradition

If your main objective is not to get the Compostela, but to enjoy pilgrim tradition, you should know that there are other routes related to Santiago the Apostle that do not end in the Cathedral of Santiago. Here we tell you about the last 100 kms of each one of them.

Camino del Salvador

The Camino del Salvador is the route that joins Oviedo and León. It is a detour from the Camino Frances that allows homage to San Salvador, in the Cathedral of Oviedo.

As we explained in the article on the Camino del Salvador, the tradition of this route dates back to the Middle Ages. The full route is 128.5 kilometres of long.

If you only want to do the last 100 kms of the Camino de San Salvador, concluding your tour in Oviedo, you can start from La Robla. From there to Oviedo Cathedral there are 101.5 kms.

Camino Uclés

The Camino Uclés is the route that departs from Madrid, towards the Monastery of Uclés, the second largest temple dedicated to Santiago the Apostle. This route has a distance of approximately 144 km.

If you want to do the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago Uclés you can start from Arganda del Rey. You can find more information about this section in the article we dedicate to the Camino de Uclés.

The last 100 kms on the Camino de los Faros

The Camino de los Faros, more than a pilgrimage route, is a hiking trail. This tour has no relation to the pilgrim tradition, as it heads for Cape Finisterre.

However, if you are looking to enjoy nature over 100 kilometres, it can also be an excellent option. The Camino de los Faros faces 152 kilometres of travel, from Malpica to Cape  Finisterre.

If you only want to do the last 100 kilometres of this route you can start from Ponteceso. From this town to Finisterre it is 104 kms. You can find more information about the characteristics of this route in the post that we dedicate to the Camino de los Faros, in our blog.

So far we have given you many options to do the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago. Most of them will allow you to get the Compostela, if you make pilgrimages on foot. We have also provided you with information about alternative routes, some linked to the Camino de Santiago and others not.

The hard part now will be deciding which route to choose. We are experts in all the routes we have discussed above and help pilgrims organize their trip.

If you have any questions or want us to help you with the logistical details of the last 100 km of the Camino de Santiago (transport, accommodation, meal plans, luggage, etc.), do not hesitate to contact us. Call us, leave us a comment at the end of this post or write to us on our Facebook. Our team would be delighted to help answer your questions!

¡Buen Camino!

Camino de Santiago: the last 100 kilometres
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